Archive | August, 2018

Are Money and Comfort Necessary for the Writing Process?

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An Essay based on A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf 

I first met Virginia Woolf at Mrs Dalloway’s party. She was a stranger – an aloof, sharp, beautiful woman with whom I didn’t feel an immediate connection. Relationships with books and authors are the same as relationships with people. With some, it’s an instant connection, recognition of a kindred spirit. But with others, it takes time. Virginia and I are still growing. The more I learn about her, the more she fascinates me. That’s why there are three of her books on the Kaizen Reading Challenge list.

 A Room of One’s Own seems an apt place to start, with its focus on what a writer needs to be able to write. Woolf comments upon various interconnected issues, but the undercurrent running throughout the whole book is the importance of money that provides for one’s basic needs so that one can focus on writing. That is as relevant today as it was in 1928. Except that today, this is no longer an issue for just women.

We have come far enough in gender equality that this issue applies to both sexes. If there are any fortunes to be inherited, it is no longer only men who inherit them. When Woolf said,s interconnected issues, but the undercurrent running throughout the whole book is the importance of money that provides for one’s basic needs so that one can focus on writing. That is as relevant today as it was in 1928. Except that today, this is no longer an issue for just women.

A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.

[Kindle Location 37, Chapter 1]

she wasn’t talking about the importance of money for its own sake. She didn’t say a woman must have thousands of pounds, a big house and a bunch of servants if she is to write fiction. It’s about what money gives you. A sense of comfort and security of knowing you have a roof over your head, bills are paid, and you have somewhere to write.

The physical comforts cannot be overrated. However lofty heights your soul may aspire to, it is framed in a corporal body. As such, it has basic human needs like every other person.

Woolf was right when she said,

The human frame being what it is, heart, body, and brain all mixed together and not contained in separate compartments as they will be no doubt in another million years, a good dinner is of great importance to good talk. One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.

[Kindle Location 237, Chapter 1]

We have not yet gotten to a stage where science can separate heart, body and brain in different compartments. However inconvenient it may be, it’s probably a good thing for our writing, enabling us to tap into not just intellectual but also our emotional capacity. However, attempting to tap into your inner muse when you don’t know where your next meal is going to come from is rarely successful. The image of a starving artist may sound romantic, but in reality, it has no more romance than the lives of millions of other starving people.

Woolf asks,

What effect has poverty on fiction? What conditions are necessary for the creation of works of art?

[Kindle Location 329, Chapter 2]

Necessity is too definitive, for it would change from person to person. Some people are able to bear discomforts more than others. Yet, it would be logical to say that comfortable conditions of living would be more conducive to the creation of works of art, and the availability of that comfort is dependent upon having money. Even if the impact of gaining some money is not as momentous as it was in Woolf’s times.

The news of my legacy reached me one night about the same time that the act was passed that gave votes to women…of the two – the vote and the money – the money, I own, seemed infinitely the more important.

[Kindle Location 486, Chapter 2]

Woolf was an intelligent, socially conscientious woman. She knew the importance of being able to vote, the tide of change it represented for women, yet it was the £500 per year that she found more valuable. For it was the money that bought her independence, without which, political rights mean very little.

Food, house, and clothing are mine for ever.

[Kindle Location 503, Chapter 2]

These basic needs were her security. They gave her the freedom to be a writer. These are the very basic needs that prevent people today from blossoming into their inner artist.

Woolf raises this in a reflection about women who lived during Shakespeare’s time. 

For it is a perennial puzzle why no woman wrote a word of that extraordinary literature when every other man, it seemed, was capable of song or sonnet.

[Kindle Location 541, Chapter 3]

It wasn’t a puzzle. Woolf knew the answer to that too.

What were the conditions in which women lived, I asked myself; for fiction, imaginative work that is, is not dropped like a pebble upon the ground, as science may be; fiction is like a spider’s web, attached ever so lightly perhaps, but still attached  to life at all four corners…But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in mid-air by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in.

[Kindle Location 543, Chapter 3]

That is the same concern we face today. The environment nurtures creativity, but it can also distract. There is a reason people pay small fortunes to attend writers’ retreats. The reality that was true then, is true now.

Dogs will bark; people will interrupt; money must be made; health will break down. Further, accentuating all these difficulties and making them harder to bear is the world’s notorious indifference. It does not ask people to write poems and novels and histories; it does not need them.

[Kindle Location 676, Chapter 3]

Art available in abundance is not perceived as necessity, and yet take it away – every book, every film, every painting, and every play – and the world will mourn its loss, and be changed forever. However, until that happens, complain about being a struggling writer, and people will tell you to get a real job.

The very people, who look down upon and give “practical” advice to the struggling artists, hero-worship successful ones. Just think about a mile long queue for book-signings, midnight book releases, and intensity of fans for success stories such as Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings or Eat Pray Love. As Woolf said,

Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for.

[Kindle Location 845, Chapter 3]

She is not the only one who’s being honest about importance of money and comfort in a writer’s life. She references Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch who said,

The poor poet has not in these days, nor has had for two hundred years, a dog’s chance…a poor child in England has little more hope than had the son of an Athenian slave to be emancipated into that intellectual freedom of which great writings are born.

[Kindle Location 1406, Chapter 3]

In today’s society, we are not absolutely ruled by the circumstances of our birth. Education is available to people of all backgrounds. With the long reach of the Internet, more and more opportunities are available for those with a vision and a drive. While a poor child in England today does not have as hopeless existence as a child of an Athenian slave, he also does not have the ease with which opportunities are available for the rich child. Intellectual freedom is still difficult to achieve, for it requires time to study, and to reflect. One can only find that time once the bills are paid, and there is a place – a room of one’s own – to sit down in.

 

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5 Reasons Why You Should Write In Your Books

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image – my copy of Lolita, marked up

 

There was a time when I would have said it was criminal to make any marks in a book. I look after my books. To treat books with care is natural for me. I don’t ever remember thinking, I must be more careful with my books. I always have been.

I always use bookmarks (or in the absence of them, something – post-it, receipt, tissue, whatever is there). The spines of my book only crack when it’s a book I re-read often, so it’s then a bit more like an old age character rather than neglect. I tell you this to establish that I love my books. I intend to have a proper library one day when I finally settle down somewhere and buy a house, so until then, all my books are waiting to have a permanent home.

However, despite my obsession with treating my books with care, I still advocate writing in books, underlining, making notes, and all sorts of things. I’m not the only one who thinks so.

Marking a book is literally an experience of your differences or agreements with the author. It is the highest respect you can pay him.

– Edgar Allen Poe

 

 5 Reasons Why You Should Write In Your Books 

 

1.  Active Reading
By underlining, or making notes as you read, you are turning reading from a passive activity into an active one. You are not merely taking in what you read, you are processing it at a deeper level. It’s useful for retaining information, but it’s also better for getting more out of what you are reading. Before you can keep an effective reading journal or a commonplace book, you need to become an active reader.

2. Thinking Out Loud
People usually mark their books when a relevant, or somehow important thought occurs to them as they read, usually because of what they are reading. By noting this down, you are thinking out loud – or rather on paper, and capturing your thought process. This will also give you invaluable insights on how your personal inner commentary relates to what you read.

3. Making Associations
Taking notes, while reading actively, will naturally lead you to make associations you might otherwise not have made. Even if you think about them, chances are you will forget them if you don’t write them now. It’s curious how many unexpected connections our mind makes, and you will find yourself recalling information from various sources, often quite unrelated, and making associations with your current reading.

4. Looking Back
Browsing through one’s marked book is a fun and often insightful thing. As you look back, you will your notes and underlines, which will tell you what made an impression on you at the time of the reading. If it’s a book you often re-read, then you might find yourself changing your opinion over time, or you might find the opposite. No matter what the final result, your markings will tell you a lot about yourself.
 
5. Leaving a Legacy
Imagine leaving not just a library behind, but a library of your very personal books. That’s a legacy indeed. What a curiosity it would be for your children and grandchildren to look at your personal notes. It will be something that brings them closer to you (or at least one member of your family, because there is usually one who appreciates such things), even after you are dead. 

How about you? Do you write or make marks on your books?